630
UNIT 3
Regulation and Integration of the Body
Related Clinical Terms
Hirsutism
(her
9
soot-izm;
hirsut
5
hairy, rough) Excessive hair
growth; usually refers to this phenomenon in women and
reflects excessive androgen production.
Hypophysectomy
(hi-pof
0
ĭ-sek
9
to-me) Surgical removal of the
pituitary gland.
Prolactinoma
(pro-lak
0
tĭ-no
9
mah;
oma
5
tumor) Te most common
type (30–40% or more) of pituitary gland tumor; evidenced
by hypersecretion of prolactin and menstrual disturbances in
women.
Psychosocial dwarfism
Dwarfism (and failure to thrive) resulting
from stress and emotional disorders that suppress hypothalamic
release of growth hormone–releasing hormone and thus anterior
pituitary secretion of growth hormone.
Tyroid storm (thyroid crisis)
A sudden and dangerous increase
in all of the manifestations of hyperthyroidism due to excessive
amounts of circulating ±H. Signs include fever, rapid heart rate,
high blood pressure, dehydration, nervousness, and tremors.
Precipitating factors include severe infection, excessive intake of
±H supplements, or trauma.
AT T H E C L I N I C
We have a new patient to consider
today. Mr. Gutteman, a 70-year-old
male, was brought into the ER in a
comatose state and has yet to come
out of it. It is obvious that he suffered severe head trauma—his
scalp was badly lacerated, and he has an impacted skull fracture.
His initial lab tests (blood and urine) were within normal limits.
His fracture was repaired and the following orders (and others)
were given:
Check qh (every hour) and record: spontaneous behavior, level
of responsiveness to stimulation, movements, pupil size and
reaction to light, speech, and vital signs.
Turn patient q4h and maintain meticulous skin care and
dryness.
1.
Explain the rationale behind these orders.
On the second day of his hospitalization, the aide reports that
Mr. Gutteman is breathing irregularly, his skin is dry and flaccid,
and that she has emptied his urine reservoir several times during
the day. Upon receiving this information, the physician ordered
Blood and urine tests for presence of glucose and ketones
Strict I&O (fluid intake and output recording)
Mr. Gutteman is found to be losing huge amounts of water in
urine and the volume lost is being routinely replaced (via IV line). Mr.
Gutteman’s blood and urine tests are negative for glucose and ketones.
Relative to these findings:
2.
What would you say Mr. Gutteman’s hormonal problem is and
what do you think caused it?
3.
Is it life threatening? (Explain your answer.)
(Answers in Appendix H)
Case Study
Endocrine System
16
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