Chapter 12
The Central Nervous System
439
12
structures forming the basal nuclei is controversial, most anatomists
agree each hemisphere’s basal nuclei include the
caudate nucleus
(kaw
9
dāt),
putamen
(pu-ta
9
men), and
globus pallidus
(glo
9
bis
pal
9
ĭ-dus)
(Figure 12.9)
.
Te comma-shaped caudate nucleus arches superiorly over
the diencephalon. ±ogether with the putamen, it forms the
stria-
tum
(stri-a
9
tum), so called because the fibers of the internal cap-
sule passing through them create a striped appearance. Although
Basal Nuclei
Deep within the cerebral white matter is the third basic region of
each hemisphere, a group of subcortical nuclei called the
basal
nuclei
or
basal ganglia
.* Although the definition of the precise
*Because a nucleus is a collection of nerve cell bodies within the CNS, the term
basal nuclei
is technically correct. Te more frequently used but misleading
historical term
basal ganglia
is a misnomer and should be abandoned, because
ganglia are PNS structures.
Striatum
(a)
Caudate
nucleus
Thalamus
Tail of caudate
nucleus
Corpus callosum
Anterior horn
of lateral ventricle
Head of caudate nucleus
Putamen
(b)
Globus
pallidus
Thalamus
Tail of caudate nucleus
Third ventricle
Cerebral cortex
Cerebral white matter
Anterior
Posterior
Inferior horn
of lateral ventricle
Putamen
Figure 12.9
Basal nuclei.
(a)
Three-dimensional view of the basal nuclei (basal ganglia),
showing their position in the cerebrum.
(b)
Transverse section of cerebrum and diencephalon
showing the relationship of the basal nuclei to the thalamus and the lateral and third ventricles.
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